Voyager Spacecraft Find Evidence of Magnetic Bubbles At Edge of Solar System

Voyager Spacecraft Find Evidence of Magnetic Bubbles At Edge of Solar System

Voyager Spacecraft Find Evidence of Magnetic Bubbles At Edge of Solar System. Image courtesy NASA.

New information coming in from the Voyager spacecraft are showing that what we think we know about the edge of the solar system may be wrong. The Voyager crafts are the farthest space measuring stations that we currently have in the solar system, and probes from these devices are sending back never before seen readings of this remote area. The development of a new computer model has allowed NASA scientists to read the distant magnetic field of the Sun all the way at the very edge of the system. The field seems to become distorted into massive bubbles over 100 million miles across. These bubbles are created by a reorganization of the magnetic fields due to the distance from the sun.

The new model recently developed of these bubbles suggests that they’ve become self-contained and fully disconnected from other magnetic field areas emanating from the sun. The magnetic fields created by the poles of the sun expand into the rest of the solar system through solar winds, created a continuous stream of particles. When these fields reach the edge of the system, interaction with other types of particles from the rest of the galaxy changes their shape and how they act.

The spinning of the Sun also creates ripples and bunches in the emanating field of magnetic energy. This adds to the strange bubble effect now seen by the Voyager probes.

This new information helps scientists model how rays from other parts of the galaxy enter and interact with our solar system. It also explains some of the interactions that our Sun has with other stars. The information was gathered by a single instrument designed to measure the amount of energy particles in a specific area. Scientists on the project are waiting for more information to come in before altering their other theories to fit this new discovery.


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