Voting For Change: Voters Make Voices Heard, Split Control Of Congress

Voting For Change: Voters Make Voices Heard, Split Control Of Congress

Voting For Change: Voters Make Voices Heard, Split Control Of Congress

The mid-term elections saw a number of changes in the makeup of Congress.  Voters turned out in droves and let their voice be heard on the state of the current American economy.  The country’s dissatisfaction over the economy was evident by the results, which handed control of the House back to Republicans while Democrats kept majority control in the Senate.

The early returns show Republicans gaining 58 seats in the House of Representatives to take control by a 235-181 margin.  Voters also showed their displeasure with the status quo by voting Republicans to an additional 6 seats in the Senate, lowering the Democratic majority to a 51-46 count.

Leading up the election, pundits speculated that Republicans had a chance to regain control of both the Senate and the House, however a few key, and in some cases unexpected, victories allowed the Democrats to maintain control of the Senate.  Possibly the most surprising victory came by longtime Democratic Senate leader Harry Reid in Nevada.  In the months and days leading up to Election Day it was widely believed that Reid would lose the election to Sharron Angle who beat out more than 10 GOP nominees in earlier primaries.  However, Reid held off the Tea Party candidate in a major victory for the Democrats.

The day was one of unprecedented change in U.S. politics as the emergence of the Tea Party was on display at the national level for the first time.  The so-called grassroots party backed a number of GOP candidates who won their races along with a few Tea Partiers who won faces of their own.  The election served to legitimize the national presence of the party in the eyes of many citizens.

In a move more symbolic than anything, Illinois voters showed their displeasure on the perceived lack of progress made by the current Presidential administration by voting a Republican, Mark Kirk, to the Senate seat formerly held by Barak Obama and vacated by the retiring Roland W. Burris.  Kirk narrowly beat Democratic opponent Alexi Giannoulias.


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