Teens Fight Back Against Bullying, But Need More Help

Teens Fight Back Against Bullying, But Need More Help

Teens Fight Back Against Bullying, But Need More Help

Teen bullying was once again brought to the attention of the media by the suicide deaths of two young people who were tormented and bullied by their classmates to the point where they felt suicide was the only way out. As October is National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, YouthQuery has released the results of a recent survey of teenagers about their experiences being bullied.

In America, one in ten 13-15 year old students and three percent of older teenagers over 16 responded that they are often or always bullied and that this practice makes them feel very upset, sad, or angry. Over 25 percent of the students said that they were sometimes bullied to that point.

59 percent of respondents said that they would take a stand and defend someone they say being bullied.  40 percent would tell an adult outside or part of the school, and nearly 40 percent would try to talk to the person to help them out.

Almost half of the teens responded that they would be willing to talk to someone if they felt like hurting themselves, with another quarter reporting they would speak to a counselor or therapist. But another quarter of them would keep those feelings to themselves.

Three in every ten students responded that they did not feel that their school counselor is helpful in a bullying situation, and an additional 20 percent were not sure. This may be due in part to the rise in cyber bullying. Where bullying once consisted of threats and behavior taking place in the open, Internet messages and cell phone text messages are now much more popular and private ways to harass a student. To stop this new form of bullying, schools and parents need to work together to make it clear that bullying is not tolerated and has serious consequences. Bullied teens need to know that they can turn to adults for support if they need to.


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