Research Shows Birds Around Chernobyl Have Smaller Brains

Research Shows Birds Around Chernobyl Have Smaller Brains

Research Shows Birds Around Chernobyl Have Smaller Brains

A research study carried out by a scientist from the University of South Carolina has discovered that birds residing near the nuclear accident site at Chernobyl have brains that are, on average, five percent smaller than normal.

It has been twenty five years since the reactor meltdown at the nuclear power plant in Chernobyl but radiation in low doses is still having a significant effect on brain development in birds as is shown in their smaller brain size.

Reduced brain size is linked to cognitive ability that is then also reduced, according to a professor of biology science at USC, Dr. Timothy Mousseau. 

Along with his colleague from the University of Paris-Sud located in France, Anders Moller, they led a team of international researchers from Italy, Norway, Ukraine, France and the United States.

The study’s findings indicate that chronic exposure to radiation in low doses has neurological effects on a broad scale. The fact that this is occurring in the bird population suggests that it is a general phenomenon. Significant repercussions in the long term may be seen from this.

At higher levels of contamination, defects of this type had been reported in organisms as well as humans in previous studies.

Dr. Mousseau has been looking into the results of the catastrophic nuclear accident at Chernobyl for twelve years and exploring the ecological consequences that the high level of radioactive contaminants wreaked on the inhabitants of the area.


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