New Report Reveals the Threat of Excess Sugar Among Teens

New Report Reveals the Threat of Excess Sugar Among Teens

New Report Reveals the Threat of Excess Sugar Among Teens

A new report in the prestigious medical magazine, Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association shows that teenage children who consume added or excess sugar in food items and soft drinks are at risk of developing poor profiles for cholesterol, a condition that can lead to diseases of the heart in adulthood.

By ‘added sugars’ the report means caloric sweeteners that are added to beverages or food items by the consumer or during the manufacturing process.

The report is titled the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and it looked at the dietary consumption of sugars in 2,517 teenaged children in the age groups 12 to 18 years old.

The researchers found that on average, the daily added sugar consumption was 28.3 tsp. or 119 grams equaling 476 calories. This represented 21.4 percent of total energy consumed.

A recent recommendation by health experts at the American heart Association sets specific limits for the daily intake of added sugars. The upper limit is based on the total calories per day that an individual needs for good health.

An average American teenage girl aged from 14 to 18 years old requires a calorie intake of 1,800 per day. In this calorie range only 100 calories should be in the form of added sugars. A person who has a 2,200 calorie requirement per day should get 150 calories or less of the daily requirement in the form of added sugars.

Most added sugar intake comes in the form of sweet beverages the study found.


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