Nearly 75% of Americans Victims of Cybercrimes

Nearly 75% of Americans Victims of Cybercrimes

Nearly 75% of Americans Victims of Cybercrimes

A report released by software leader Norton found that cybercrime has affected the lives of nearly three-quarters of all Americans.  In their report, “The Norton Cybercrime Report: The Human impact”, the software maker found that 65% of global Internet users had been victimized by cybercrime, and a staggering 75% of American Internet users had been as well.  America ranks as the third most victimized country in the world according to the report.

While the number of people harmed by cybercrime is of great interest, the real gem of the Norton report was the look it took into how those cybercrimes impact the emotions of the victims.  Not surprisingly, the most common response to victimization is anger, with 58% saying that was their initial reaction.  Following was annoyed at 51%, and cheated at 40%.  Just 3% of respondents say they have no fear of cybercrimes, and a whopping 80% never expect cybercriminals to be caught and have to face legal consequences.

The report shows one of the main reasons that few cybercriminals, such as identity thieves and hackers, will not be caught is because victims fail to report the crime.  Only 44% of cybercrime victims reported the incident to police.  Of those who did file a report with police, Norton found that it took an average of 28 days to solve the crime.  The length of time it took to solve the crime was listed as the biggest hassle victims faced during the police investigations.

Norton says that while a high number of people around the world are victims of cybercrimes, there are simple steps that can be taken to limit your exposure.  The company, who makes security software, says that having an up-to-date comprehensive computer security system in place while browsing the web is essential.  It also recommends that users not download files from untrusted places, as this can leave users open to a virus or other underhanded tactics that cybercriminals use.


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