Kidney Stones More Likely to Form During the Summer

Kidney Stones More Likely to Form During the Summer

Kidney Stones More Likely to Form During the Summer

Recent health research has proven that the rate of kidney stone development has risen steadily over the past 3 decades. Since modern Americans are at a naturally higher risk for developing these painful stones, they also need to be aware that the heat of summer causes the risk to rise even more. Urologists, doctors who specialize in disorders of the urinary system, are warning adults around the country to maintain a steady fluid intake during the summer.

One in 300 adults in the U.S. feel the pain of kidney stones each year says the National Institute of Health. States with warm temperatures in the summers, like California and Florida, have residents with even higher rates of kidney stone incidents. This trend begins as spring temperatures rise and worsens during the heat of summer. Men are more prone to kidney stones, and in most cases the risk rises as you age. However, due to outdoor sports and extra exertion during summer, adults between 20 and 40 become more susceptible to kidney issues during this time. Dehydration is a major part of this trend. There are concrete steps that anyone can take to prevent kidney problems anytime of the year, but these tips are especially important in this season.

Remember to drink more water. Staying hydrated keeps the minerals that create kidney stones moving through the bladder instead of settling in the kidneys. Lemonade is a great summer drink choice because the citric acid in lemons works to prevent stone formation. If you have a naturally increased risk for kidney problems, try switching to a low-oxalate diet for the summer. Avoid foods full of calcium-oxalate. This mineral is a key part of kidney stones. Despite what may seem obvious, drinking plenty of calcium rich milk actually lowers your chances of developing a calcium based stone. Calcium citrate, usually taken in pill form, does raise your chances.


Log in