FDA Approves Teflaro for Bacterial Infections

FDA Approves Teflaro for Bacterial Infections

FDA Approves Teflaro for Bacterial Infections

Teflaro, a new antibiotic treatment, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Ceftaroline fosamil, also known as Teflaro, is an injectable antibiotic that can be used to treat difficult bacterial infections. Researchers have shown that it is effective at treating adults with community acquired bacterial pneumonia, or CABP. This dangerous form of pneumonia forms from the bacteria an adult is exposed to in their home or workplace, and not in the hospital setting.

A variety of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections respond to Teflaro, including the destructive Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA infection that has become resistant to many strains of antibiotics. MRSA is currently resistant to methicillin, oxacillin, penicillin and amoxicillin antibiotics, making treatment difficult. The large abscesses formed by the infection often require surgical treatment.

MRSA infections have been most common among health care workers or others regularly exposed to health care settings, according to research by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Having a working antibiotic that can stop or destroy a MRSA infection greatly speeds up the healing process for a patient infected.

Teflaro is a cephalosporin antibiotic, and should not be used by patients with a sensitivity to this class of medication. It has only been tested in patients 18 years and older. In both clinical trials, the new antibiotic was as effective as the most successful current treatments for both bacterial pneumonia and MRSA infections. It’s most common side effects are diarrhea, nausea and a skin rash.


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