90% of Americans Say to Outlaw Cell Phone Use While Driving, But Half Still Do It

90% of Americans Say to Outlaw Cell Phone Use While Driving, But Half Still Do It

90% of Americans Say to Outlaw Cell Phone Use While Driving, But Half Still Do It

Over half of American drivers admit to talking or texting on their cell phones while operating a motor vehicle, but 90% of them agree that it should be made illegal. The results of the 2010 Chubb Driver Distraction Survey, administered by the Chubb Group of Insurance Companies, show that American drivers may know that cell phones distract them while driving, but many of them use the devices anyways.

1,000 drivers across the country were asked about their cell phone usage while driving. 356 participants admitted to holding a cell phone and talking on it, but almost half of them agreed that it should be made illegal. Alternately, only 11% of the 315 who admitted to using a hands free system think it should be outlawed. Nearly a third of drivers under the age of 35 said that they have sent a text message while driving, but 80% of the total 133 who admitted to texting think it should be banned.

Over 60% of respondents have eaten food or drank a beverage while driving, making it the most common distracting behavior. Nearly 8 in 10 participants claimed to have seen someone applying makeup or brushing their hair while driving, yet under 10% admitted to those behaviors. Over 5,000 people died in highway accidents during 2009 that involved a distraction, and over half a million drivers were injured. Minor distractions can lead to serious injuries or death.

Statistics from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety show that drivers using hand-held devices, such as cellphones, have a risk that is four times higher for serious, injury causing crashes. Many states are enacting laws to ban talking and texting while driving, but drivers need to take the imitative to avoid or reduce these risky behaviors on their own to make all roadways a safer place to drive.


Log in